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Ask the Monger: Is Cheese High in Sodium?


 Why are cheeses so salty, and are there any low-sodium options? Sodium chloride, or table salt, is a key ingredient in cheesemaking. It helps draw moisture out of the curd while also binding with the water molecules that remain in the cheese, making that water unavailable for food spoilage microbes. Salt also enhances flavor, and […]

Sheep Milk Yogurt - Old Chatham

Ask the Monger: Why is Yogurt Not Considered Cheese?


They use the same ingredients and go through much of the same process. So when do cheese and yogurt diverge?

Rush Creek Reserve

Ask the Monger: Why Do Some Cheeses Get Runnier With Age?


Why do some cheeses get firmer as they age, while other cheeses get runnier? We delve into the science behind your favorite wedges.

Ask the Monger: What Are the Health Benefits of Cheese?


Cheese is a delicious addition to any meal (or a snack), but did you know it’s also an excellent source of minerals, protein, and calories?

Ask the Monger: How Can I Gift Cheese?


Cheese expert Gianaclis Caldwell explains how to properly send cheeses in the mail.

Ask the Monger: Why Are Washed-Rind Cheeses Orange?


Ever wondered where washed-rind cheeses get their color? We have your answer.

Ask the Monger: What is Listeria?


 What is listeria? Am I at risk?   Listeria comprise a large group, or genus, of bacteria found in the environment—particularly in soil, animal bedding, and other wet areas on farms. Although most members are harmless, one species in particular, Listeria monocytogenes, can be deadly. An infection with this culprit is called listeriosis. As with most […]

bay blue

Ask the Monger: What’s the Difference Between Blue Pockets and Streaks?


Why do some blue cheeses have pockets while others have streaks? When it comes to blues, there are some slight variances that determine the texture, flavor, and, yes, even the style of veining. You may notice some cheeses have a more open structure, where blue molds like Penicillium roqueforti can thrive. These are called “pockets.” […]