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In Queso You Missed It February 25th


You’re almost there, cheese friends! Just a few more days until you can say you survived February. Until then, warm up a cuppa and tuck into these nuggets of news.

Here’s what you might have missed this week in the world of cheese:

  • The truth has been revealed about where Cheddar gets its color. Orange you glad the cheese industry is so transparent?
     
  • In a tit-for-tat trade dispute, the EU may use cheese as a weapon to turn Wisconsin from red to blue.
     
  • What’s been keeping some Twitter users up at night? Let’s just say we’re crossing mac and cheese off our list of brain-foods.
     
  • Our friend Janet Fletcher announced six reasons to go to Napa this year. Oh alright, if we must.
     
  • What do gold, the Balkan donkey, and the British all have in common? They make the most lavish cheese in the world, of course.
     
  • This guide gives all you gateway cheese lovers out there a chance to walk on the wild side. Bring on the Chällerhocker!
     
  • Parmigiano-Reggiano is near and dear to all our hearts, but might we make room for one more Italian stallion? Here’s lookin’ at you, Pecorino.
     
  • For those of you who are one sly notch of dignity above licking goat cheese off a knife for breakfast in your jammies, have a crack at this Soufflazy.
     
  • Mac and cheese can cure a hangover and heal a broken heart, but did you know it also has the power to save puppies and kittens?
     
  • What does one do with a $500 block of aged white cheddar cheese? Duh — carve a face into it.
     
  • We’d like to give the gold statue to all the cheesemakers and farm animals that worked so hard to produce these amazing cheeses.

Sam Jones

Sam Jones is currently pursuing her Master's degree in Agriculture, Food, and Environment at Tufts University. She has worked on organic vegetable farms in France, Scotland, and Washington as well as on a chicken and pig farm in Colorado. She is passionate about telling farmers' stories and exploring the varied agricultural methods that go into making delicious cheese around the world.

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