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Buckwheat Crepes with Fried Eggs and Ham


Buckwheat Crepes with Fried Eggs and Ham
Serves 8
These delicate crepes take some practice to get right—but they’re worth mastering. If you chill the batter overnight, let it come to room temperature before cooking.
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Ingredients
    Crepes
    1. ¼ cup all-purpose flour
    2. ¼ cup buckwheat flour
    3. ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
    4. 2 eggs
    5. ¾ cup whole milk
    6. 1 to 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, for greasing skillet
    Toppings
    1. 8 ounces ham, thinly sliced (or Canadian bacon)
    2. 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
    3. 8 eggs
    4. 2 cups grated Gruyère
    5. 4 tablespoons chopped fresh chives
    Instructions
      Crepes
      1. In a large bowl, whisk together flours and salt. Add eggs and milk, and whisk until thoroughly combined. Cover and refrigerate at least 30 minutes or overnight.
      2. Heat the oven to 200°F. Melt a scant tablespoon of butter in a 9- or 10-inch nonstick or cast iron skillet over medium heat. Ladle in just enough batter to thinly cover the bottom of the pan, about 1 ounce. Swirl to coat the pan. Cook until lightly browned on the bottom, then flip and cook another 30 seconds. Stack crepes on an ovenproof plate, and transfer to the oven to keep warm. If crepes begin sticking to skillet, add more butter. Continually mix batter as you fry crepes; the flour tends to settle.
      TOPPINGS
      1. In a large skillet, sear ham over medium-high heat. Set aside. Wipe out pan, melt butter, reduce heat to medium, and fry eggs.
      2. Top each warm crepe with ¼ cup cheese, 1 ounce ham, 1 fried egg, and a sprinkle of chives. Serve immediately.
      culture: the word on cheese https://culturecheesemag.com/

      Molly Shuster

      Molly is a freelance food stylist, writer and recipe developer. She is one of the co-recipe editors of Gather Journal and has had her work published in various publications including Boston Magazine, Yankee Magazine, The New York Times, Food and Wine, Family Fun, The Boston Globe and Edible Vineyard, among others. Molly currently divides her time between New York and Boston.