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Muffaletta Sandwich


Muffaletta Sandwich
This flavor-packed sandwich is the size of a hubcap! While every restaurant in New Orleans makes theirs differently, we’ve tried to base our recipe on the legendary Central Grocery muffuletta.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup pitted green olives
  2. ¼ cup chopped roasted red peppers
  3. ½ cup chopped giardiniera
  4. 2 tablespoons finely minced parsley leaves
  5. 1 tablespoon finely minced capers
  6. 1 large clove garlic, finely minced
  7. 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  8. 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  9. 1 10-inch muffuletta or focaccia roll
  10. ⅓ pound sweet or spicy sopressata
  11. ⅓ pound capicola
  12. ⅓ pound mortadella
  13. ⅓ pound provolone cheese
Instructions
  1. Add green olives, red peppers, and giardiniera to a food processor, and pulse for 1-second intervals, about 6 times, until all pieces are about ¼ inch. Transfer to a medium bowl, and mix in minced parsley, capers, and garlic. Add vinegar and olive oil and stir until evenly combined into a spread. Cover, and refrigerate for 2 to 8 hours.
  2. Use a serrated knife to cut the muffuletta roll in half as you would an English muffin. Give the olive spread a quick stir to incorporate all the vinegar and oil, and spread half on each piece of bread.
  3. On the bottom half of the bread, layer half the sopressata, half the capicola, half the mortadella, and half the provolone. Repeat the layers, then top with the other spread-slathered piece of bread. Press down firmly, cut into quarters, and serve.
Notes
  1. * If you want to derivate from the traditional cheese for this recipe, here are some suggestions for alternate cheeses, all pulled from the 75 award-winning cheeses described within our Best Cheeses 2014 issue.
    • Caseificio Di Nucci Caciocavallo Stagionato in Cantina di Pietra
    • Sartori Limited Edition Pastorale Blend
    • Gold Creek Farms Smoked Cheddar
    • Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Washed-Rind Brick
culture: the word on cheese https://culturecheesemag.com/

Amy Scheuerman

Amy Scheuerman—culture's former web director—spent eight years in North Carolina where she developed a love of barbecue and biscuits before moving up north to get a degree in nutrition. She now works at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

Photographer Dominic Perri

Dominic Perri is a passionate food photographer splitting his time between Massachusetts and New York City. He has been professionally photographing food for almost 10 years. See more of his work at http://www.dominicperri.com/