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Orange-Almond Tart


Orange-Almond Tart
Yields 1
Almond-enriched pastry crust brims with sweet-tart orange curd in this elegant dessert. Blood oranges yield a beautiful, rosy-hued filling; if you can’t find them, try red grapefruit juice instead.
Ingredients
    BLOOD ORANGE CURD
    1. 1 cup freshly squeezed blood orange juice (from 4 blood oranges), plus 1 tablespoon blood orange zest
    2. ¼ cup lemon juice (from 1 medium lemon), plus 1 tablespoon lemon zest
    3. 4 egg yolks, plus 1 whole egg
    4. ½ cup granulated sugar
    5. 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch pieces
    6. Pinch sea salt
    ALMOND PASTRY CRUST
    1. ½ cup almond flour
    2. 1 cup all-purpose flour
    3. 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
    4. Pinch sea salt
    5. 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh rosemary
    6. 8 tablespoons (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch pieces, plus more for greasing tart pan
    7. 3 tablespoons ice water
    Instructions
      BLOOD ORANGE CURD
      1. Bring orange and lemon juices to a simmer in a medium saucepan set over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook until juice has reduced to 1 cup, about 7 to 10 minutes. Stir in orange and lemon zest.
      2. Whisk egg yolks, whole egg, and sugar in a small bowl until combined. Scrape sugar mixture into the saucepan and stir to combine. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until mixture thickens and coats the back of a spoon, 5 to 7 minutes. Add butter, 1 piece at a time, stirring constantly as it melts. Remove from heat.
      3. Set a fine-mesh strainer over a small bowl and strain curd. Discard zest. Stir in a pinch of salt and let curd cool about 30 minutes. Transfer curd to a lidded container and refrigerate at least 4 hours or overnight.
      ALMOND PASTRY CRUST
      1. Add first 5 ingredients to the bowl of a food processor and pulse to combine. Add butter and pulse to form a pebbly mixture. Add ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time, pulsing after each addition. Dough should form a shaggy mass. If it’s still dry, add a splash more ice water to help it come together.
      2. Turn dough out onto a floured surface and gather into a ball. Flatten into a disk, cover tightly with plastic wrap, and refrigerate at least 1 hour or overnight.
      3. Heat oven to 375°F. Roll dough into a 12-inch round and press into a greased 9-inch tart pan. Press dough up the sides of the pan and trim overhang. Freeze tart shell for 15 minutes.
      4. Center tart pan on a baking sheet, prick dough surface all over with a fork, and cover dough with foil. Fill with dried beans or rice (or use pie weights) and bake 10 to 15 minutes or until crust just begins to brown. Remove from oven and remove foil and weights. Return crust to oven and bake 17 to 20 minutes more, until golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool completely.
      TO ASSEMBLE
      1. When tart shell is cool, fill with curd, using a rubber spatula to spread evenly and smooth top. Refrigerate until ready to serve.
      Notes
      1. Whipped crème fraîche is a rich, creamy counterpoint to the citrusy tart.
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      Rebecca Haley-Park

      Rebecca Haley-Park is culture's Managing Editor and resident stinky cheese cheerleader. A native New Englander, she holds a BFA in creative writing from University of Maine at Farmington. Her favorite cheese: Harbison

      Photographer Evi Abeler

      Evi Abeler is a food and still life photographer based in New York City. She helps art directors, cookbook authors and designers to communicate the love, passion and thought that goes into every project and creates modern, yet classic images. Her clients in advertising, publishing, hospitality and retail include Food & Wine Magazine (which named her Digital Food Award Winner), Harper Collins Publishing and Whole Foods Markets.

      Leigh Belanger

      Leigh Belanger stands tall as culture's food editor. She's been a food writer, editor, and project manager for over a decade, serving as program director for Chefs Collaborative and contributing to local newspapers and magazines, where she's written about whoopie pies, food policy, and cheesemaking chefs. Her first book, The Boston Homegrown Cookbook, was published in 2012. She lives and cooks in Boston with her family.