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Sainte-Maure de Touraine Salad with Apples and Pistachio Butter


Sainte-Maure de Touraine Salad with Apples and Pistachio Butter
Serves 2
Sainte-Maure was soft-spoken, more fragile. He reclined on the couch in his gray fur coat and murmured in his sleep about a salad. “Pistachios,” he whispered, his whiskers twitching, “apples, grapes.” I darted into the kitchen and rummaged for my mandoline. A cheese so delicate requires a salad of thin shavings, I think. Using a mandoline, I shredded cucumbers and apples, a few green onions, and then I tossed these with greens and some lemon. Nothing more. Instead of adding pistachios on top, I climbed into the fridge to root out a jar of pistachio butter. The inspiration came from a salad I once ate that was served on a swirl of homemade pistachio butter—I love the memory of the fork tines catching on a little bit of that cream as I swept up each bite of salad.
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Ingredients
  1. ½ green apple, thinly sliced
  2. 1 celery stalk, thinly sliced
  3. 1 green onion, thinly sliced
  4. 2 handfuls of mixed greens
  5. half a lemon
  6. sea salt
  7. dill and mint, for garnish
  8. handfuls of grapes
  9. 4 tablespoons pistachio butter (see note)
  10. Sainte-Maure de Touraine
Instructions
  1. Toss apple slices, celery, green onion, and greens in a bowl with lemon and sea salt. Mix with your hands. Serve on a plate you have prepared with a good shmear of pistachio butter. Sprinkle with fresh herbs and grapes, and top with a few sliced rounds of Sainte Maure de Touraine
Notes
  1. You can buy prepared pistachio butter, which I used initially. Then I tried making my own using a recipe from Coffee and Quinoa. All you have to do is combine a cup of pistachios with honey in a food processor—add some coconut oil along the way to smooth things out. The results are delicious, but I didn’t achieve quite the same ultra creamy consistency I yearned for. Just sayin’.
culture: the word on cheese https://culturecheesemag.com/

Tenaya Darlington

Tenaya Darlington teaches food writing at Saint Joseph’s University. She blogs at www.madamefromageblog.com and co-hosts tours with Cheese Journeys. While writing this post, she nursed a gin martini and nibbled a hunk of Pecorino Ginepro.

Goat Cheeses of France

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