☰ menu   

One Cheese, Five Ways: Gouda


With its distinct disk shape and oft-waxed rind, Gouda is perhaps the Netherlands’ most famous export. Named after one of Europe’s largest cheese markets—Goudse Kaasmarkt, in the town of Gouda, Holland—it’s a versatile cheese with taste, texture, and looks that change as the curds ripen. When just a few months old, the iconic cow’s milk cheese is mild and sweet with a supple, semi-soft texture. As the wheels mature, they firm up and take on more complex flavors. (Fans of older Gouda, aged for two years or more, love the smoky, butterscotchy notes and crunchy tyrosine crystals in the paste.) No matter the age, Gouda adds character to all kinds of dishes—from rich corn pudding to a classic summer burger.

Gouda Burger with Quick Pickles

gouda burger with quick pickles

Nutty aged Gouda is a welcome departure from traditional burger choices such as cheddar or American cheese.


Grilled Vegetables with Parsley-Basil Pesto

grilled vegetables with parsley-basil pesto

This pesto gets a deep salted caramel note from aged Gouda, which meshes well with fennel and broccoli.


Three-Allium Quiches

three-allium quiches

Aged Gouda brings out the oniony sweetness in these mini pastries. Serve with a simple green salad for lunch or a light supper.


Smoked Gouda Twists

smoked gouda twists

Bake smoked Gouda into these irresistible cocktail hour treats.


Cheesy Corn Pudding

cheesy corn pudding

This pudding is a savory-sweet foil to grilled meat and summer vegetables—a swell side dish for your next cookout.

Molly Shuster

Molly is a freelance food stylist, writer and recipe developer. She is one of the co-recipe editors of Gather Journal and has had her work published in various publications including Boston Magazine, Yankee Magazine, The New York Times, Food and Wine, Family Fun, The Boston Globe and Edible Vineyard, among others. Molly currently divides her time between New York and Boston.

Photographer Lauren Volo

New York City-based photographer Lauren Volo has been shooting our "One Cheese, Five Ways" feature for over a year—hard job, huh?